WORK Turbochargers

Ford Powerstroke 6.0L Turbochargers

Restore the original performance of your 2003-2007 6.0 Ford Powerstroke!  TurboRepair has new genuine Garrett replacement turbochargers that will provide years of reliable service for your truck in stock, all at a fraction of the dealership cost.  Each Garrett turbo comes complete with installation hardware, and features the latest updates to the AVNT control systems for precise power delivery, as well as the latest updates to the bearing and seal structures for durability.  Say goodbye to "sticking" vanes, oil consumption and lack of power! All new Garrett 6.0 Powerstroke turbochargers are on sale for $799.00 shipped to the lower 48 US states.  In stock and ready for immediate delivery. Contact us today, we will be more than happy to help you with your turbocharger replacement needs.


 2003-2004 Model  years:

Fits trucks with a production date of 9/22/03 or earlier.  Direct fit for your truck, uses the latest revisions to the AVNT solenoid, unison ring and housing vanes.  Comes complete with installation hardware and gaskets.  If you are unsure of your year model application,  contact us and we will be more than happy to help!  Replaces OE turbochargers with the following part numbers: 725309-5003, 725309-0003, 1832160C91 and others. 

Click here to order online.


 2004.5-2005 Model Years

Direct fit for your truck, uses the latest revisions to the AVNT solenoid, unison ring and housing vanes.  Comes complete with installation hardware and gaskets.  If you are unsure of your year model application,  contact us and we will be more than happy to help!  Replaces turbochargers with the following part numbers: 743250-0013, 743250-5013, 1832159C91 and others.

Click here to order online


2005.5-2007 Model Years:

Direct fit for your truck, uses the latest revisions to the AVNT solenoid, unison ring and housing vanes.  Comes complete with installation hardware and gaskets.  If you are unsure of your year model application,  contact us and we will be more than happy to help!  Replaces OE turbochargers with the following part numbers: 743250-0014, 743250-5014, 1832255C91 and others

Click here to order online.

Ford Powerstroke 6.0L Turbo Troubleshooting

This page will be dedicated to providing the latest information about the 6.0 Liter Powerstroke Ford turbocharger.  Please check back often for updates on the latest diagnosis, troubleshooting, FAQ's, performance updates as well as a little history regarding the Garrett VGT turbocharger.  If you have any questions or topics you would like discussed, please contact us via email.  Thank you- WORK Turbochargers


 6..0PS FAQ

 

The number one problem we see out of the 6.0 Garrett Powerstroke turbocharger is carbon-coking of the VGT actuator assembly.  The turbocharger pictured above (shown without the turbine housing) illustrates the condition of most units we see.  Take the time to note the amount of carbon present on the bearing housing


 6.. Powerstroke FAQ

The closeup picture shows the actuator bell crank arm, all of the carbon build up is the result of oil leaking out of the assembly into the turbine housing, where the high heat from the exhaust turns it into carbon. Once the carbon builds up, the bell crank's rotation is stopped before it reaches the desired position.  If this arm cannot rotate properly the variable vanes located in the turbine housing will not be directed in the right direction, causing poor turbocharger response and power.  WORK Turbochargers corrects this problem in every turbocharger rebuild, ensuring proper VAT actuator function for years to come.


6.0PS FAQ

 This picture illustrates the VAT nozzle ring and the corresponding receiver groove that the bell crank is located in.  You can see the resulting carbon that has accumulated in the housing from oil that has leaked past the bell crank arm seal.  Once this carbon builds up enough, the nozzle ring cannot turn within the turbine housing, keeping the VAT nozzle blades from rotating into position.


 6.0Powerstroke FAQ

Here you will see the nozzle ring along with all the VAT nozzle blades.  In this picture all the nozzle blades are in the full open position, as controlled by the VAT solinoid that is used to determine turbocharger boost output.  When the nozzles are in this position the turbocharger is producing maximum exhaust flow.


 60Powerstroke FAQ 

 The nozzle position in this picture illustrates the system in a full closed position.  At this point the exhaust velocity directed at the turbin wheel assembly is at its highest point, creating fast spool up and boost response. The most important thing for this system to operate properly is for it to be carbon free.  Any carbon present in the housing can potentially inhibit proper rotation of the nozzle ring and subsequent power output from the engine.


Light Surge after Turbo Replacement:

  • 2004-2006 engines that exhibit a light surge on light acceleration up to 50 MPH, typically after a cold start, at steady speeds between 1800-2800, or when climbing a grade (towing or not), may have a sticking Variable Geometry Turbo actuator. If diagnosis leads to replacement of the VGT actuator, the turbo lube oil line--P/N 3C3Z-9T516-BA; should be replace as well. Broadcast Message 4459, TSB 05-21-5.

Lack of Power After Turbo Replacement:

  • When replacing a turbo for a lack of power and/or excessive smoke/oil consumption, inspect the turbine housing for the presence of the turbine wheel. If the turbine wheel shears off it will drop into the downpipe and cause a lack of power, possibly along with trouble codes P2263 (03/early 04) or P0299 (04.25-up). Broadcast Message 4449.

Coking (carbon) Deposits in Turbo and/or EGR Valve:

  • Coking deposits are usually a build up of unburned fuel or oil in the exhaust system and related components (valves, turbo, EGR valve). This can be caused by poor fuel quality, overfueling/leaking injectors, idling for excessive periods of time (especially in cold ambient temperatures), low engine operating temperatures, injection timing (calibration) or oil consumption. Unburned fuel usually appears as white smoke, but over time the coking condition can result in excessive black smoke. Coking depositis can plug the EBP sensor tube, foul the EBP sensor, cause the EGR valve to stick open, block the EGR cooler, plug the MAP (boost) sensor hose, or cause the variable turbo vanes to stick open (no power/boost) or closed (excessive backpressure, black smoke, popping noise, bucking). The cause of the coking issue should be identified before replacing parts to prevent reoccurance. If poor fuel is suspected, use Stanadyne Performance or Motorcraft PM-17-A Cetane Boost. TSB 06-4-12, 06-23-16.

Low Power/No Boost and/or Code P0299 or P2263:

  • If the turbocharger is suspected to be the cause of low boost, it should be tested by manually activating the variable geometry turbo control valve. The engine should be at operating temperature. Using the WDS active commands in datalogger, monitor , VGT%, RPM abd MGP. Set the RPM to 1200 and the VGT% to 0 and record the EBP and MGP readings. Increase VGT to 85% and watch for an increase in EBP and MGP, and listen for a whistle from the turbo. If there is no pressure increase or whistle, check the control wiring for the VGT by installing a est light in the VGT harness and commanding the VGT from 0-85%--the light should be off and then slowly brighten. If the wiring checks out, replace the VGT control valve (P/N 3C3Z-6F089-AA) and retest. If the condition is unchanged, then replace the turbocharger. Broadcast Message 0887.
  • Engineering is currently investigating false P2263 codes. Broadcast Message 1290, 3005

Variable Geometry Turbo Solenoid Diagnosis:

  • Some trucks with the 6.0 diesel engine may exhibit a lack of power/no boost concern. The variable geometry turbo (VGT) actuator should be checked for operation: The engine should be at operating temperature. With the engine running and the engine in park/neutral, use WDS to control engine speed to 1200 RPM. While watching exhaust backpressure (EBP) and manifold gauge pressure (MGP), control the VGT actuator (VGT_DC) to 0% and 65%. If the MPG and EBP do not increase as VGT_DC is increased, inspect the wiring to the VGT. If there is no problems found in the wiring, replace the VGT actuator (P/N 3C3Z-6F089-AA) and retest. If there is no change, replace the turbo. SSM 0824.
  • If the EBP does increase, and you can hear the turbo pitch change, but the MGP reading does not change, this indicates a problem other than the VGT or turbo.